PERIODONTAL

DISEASE

PERIODONTAL

DISEASE

Periodontal Therapy

Dealing with periodontal disease can be a pain, but here at Woodyard Dental Care PSC, we are more than happy to help you get back on your feet with excellent oral health. Any disease can cause a lot of problems throughout the body, and periodontal (or gum) disease is no different. However, without pain as a major symptom, it is hard to catch it early. Here is some general information on what the disease is, and how you can prevent it. For more information or to set up an appointment, give us a call today.

What Is Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal disease, more commonly known simply as gum disease, is a disease that attacks the gums (or tissues) that surround and support each of your teeth. There are a few symptoms that allow you to catch it early on. However, pain does not often accompany gum disease in its earliest stages. If you notice that your gums are tender, you may want to start watching out for other symptoms or come in for an appointment for us to take a quick look.

Some other symptoms to watch out for include bleeding gums (healthy gums should not bleed when brushing normally), halitosis, a gap between your gums and your teeth or a receding gum-line, loose teeth, or a difference in how it feels to bite, or how your teeth fit together when you do so. Gingivitis is the earliest stage of gum disease, and it can often be treated with a standard cleaning and more regular care. When periodontitis develops and bone loss is present, early stages may be treated by cleaning and debriding the area allowing the gums to heal and become healthy. Then dedicated more frequent visits to maintain your healthy gums are often needed.

As it becomes more advanced, this can lead to tooth and bone loss and much more serious complications. Good dental care means the difference between getting worse and staying healthy.

How Can I Prevent It?

Preventing periodontal disease is pretty simple. Just like you would if you were preventing tooth decay, brushing twice a day (once before bedtime, for sure) and flossing at least once, can make a huge difference in your risk. Using mouthwash is also a definite, as it stimulates your gums as you swish it around, and it gets to the gums between your teeth that you might have missed where bacteria may collect.

Be sure to look at other risk factors such as smoking or even pregnancy. Quitting smoking can decrease your risk of gum disease. If you are pregnant, it may be more difficult to maintain your gums and regular dental visits are even more important. The biggest reason someone develops gum disease can be their overall health and going without care. So frequent visits to get your teeth and gums cleaned and checked out at least twice a year are the best way to prevent gum disease.

Periodontal disease is pretty common but can have devastating consequences. Woodyard Dental Care PSC is here to help make sure that you can avoid all the pain and hassle that can accompany dealing with gum disease by preventing it in the first place. If you are worried you may have developed gum disease, or just want more information, give us a call today at (270) 408-1321 to set up an appointment with our expert staff!

WHAT TO EXPECT WITH PERIODONTAL TREATMENT

Step 1

Comprehensive examination to determine reason for bone loss

Step 2


Right & left side are numbed and debrided of bacteria

Step 3

6 week post up to reveal healing and success

Step 4

Possible surgery needed but only if indicated

Maintenance - Periodontal Health and You

One of the best ways to keep your gums from bleeding when you come in for a cleaning is to floss regularly. Brushing your teeth before or after flossing is less important than whether you floss or not.

Of course, impressing us with gums that don't bleed isn't really the point. Bleeding can indicate a need for improved gum maintenance and oral health habits. And if you are still smoking, quit now. Smoking causes gum disease, bone loss and
Oral Cancer

Diabetes and Periodontal Disease: A Two-Way Street?

In prior articles, we have noted that diabetics have a higher risk of periodontal disease (PD). But in this issue, we'd like to share with you the growing body of evidence that suggests that PD can adversely affect the metabolic control of diabetes.

One two-year longitudinal trial showed an increased risk of worsening glycemic control in type 2 diabetics with severe periodontitis compared to those without periodontitis. Glycemic control is the body's ability to transfer glucose from the bloodstream into tissues such as muscle.

According to a report in the Journal of the American Dental Association, "Chronic periodontal diseases have the potential to exacerbate insulin resistance and worsen glycemic control, while periodontal treatment that decreases inflammation may help diminish insulin resistance."

People with inflammatory PD can have increased levels of cytokines, a small protein that affects the interactions between cells. Resistance to insulin can ensue, diminishing glycemic control. Some research shows an improvement in control after periodontal therapy.

Other studies appear to show that the dental therapies of scaling and root planing in combination with a course of antibiotics can result in an improvement in glycemic control. However, outcomes of other studies are less clear or even contradictory.

More research may help clarify the precise affect of PD on diabetes. For now, we advise you to follow our recommended preventions for periodontal disease. and pursue lifestyle choices that help reduce your chance of developing diabetes.

Periodontal Disease and Heart Disease

The link between periodontal disease (PD) and cardiovascular disease is becoming clearer. Pooling results from seven separate studies conducted between 1989 and 2007 found people with periodontal disease are at significantly higher risk (34%) of developing cardiovascular disease compared to those without.

These observational studies do not specify whether treatment of periodontitis (PD) reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, but it is a good example of how the health of the human body's systems may be interconnected.

Gum Disease Linked to Pregnancy

The link between Periodontal Disease (PD) and pregnancy is well established. But new research suggests another link. According to the
American Academy Of Periodontology, pregnant women who have periodontal disease "may be seven times more likely to have a baby that is born too early and too small."

The disease may cause an increase in the biological fluids that induce labor, increasing the risk of having a premature baby. The Academy encourages women who are considering pregnancy to be screened for PD.

Arthritis and Gum Disease

"The common denominator here is the inflammatory aspect of both diseases," according to President of the New Jersey Society of Periodontists Dr. Scott Zirkin. Because chronic bacterial infection is associated with periodontal disease, the system experiences an inflammatory response. The ensuing chronic inflammation not only taxes the immune system but it can destroy connective tissue and bone tissue, both teeth and joints.

So here's the good news for rheumatoid arthritis sufferers. A study in the Journal Of Periodontology found that people who suffer from both Periodontal Disease and rheumatoid arthritis had fewer swollen joints and stiffness when they brought their periodontal disease under control.

"The mouth/body connection is very strong and should not be underestimated by those living with arthritis or their caregivers," says Zirkin. We would like to take that one step further and tell you that the mouth/body connection should not be underestimated by any of our patients because there are many body-related complications associated with periodontal disease, not just rheumatoid arthritis.

Arthritis sufferers may be more likely to develop periodontal disease and resolving periodontal disease can be more difficult for them. That's because arthritis can make it challenging to practice proper oral hygiene such as brushing and flossing. If you have limited manual dexterity and need help fighting or preventing periodontal disease we can help. We have methods, strategies, and tools that can make it easier for you to maintain a proper oral hygiene regime.

Testimonials

Absolutely wonderful experience. Dr. Woodyard explains everything very well and is a true professional. The whole staff is very accommodating and caring.


Jay S

Dr. Woodyard has been my general dentist for more than 10 years and he’s always been so concerned and professional. He is up to date on all the newest innovative treatments. He has done several crowns for me and I was able to get it all done in one day since they were made with the latest technology in house by Dr. Woodyard. I would highly recommend him for all dental needs.

Melissa W

Best dentist I've been to! Very professional operation in all respects. Love that Dr. Woodyard does the majority of usual procedures right in house -- including crowns and root canals. Getting a crown in one visit is truly amazing. Mary is a wonderful hygienist with a solid knowledge of her area of expertise. You won't be disappointed!


Dan J

HOURS

Monday: By Appointment Only

Tuesday: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Wednesday: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Thursday: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Friday: 7:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Sat & Sun: Closed

Note: We are closed for lunch from 1 - 2 Tue, Wed, & Thurs

12:30 - 1:00 Friday

Address:

4915 Village Square Dr.

Paducah, ​​​​​​​KY 42001

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HOURS

Monday: By Appointment Only

Tuesday: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Wednesday: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Thursday: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Friday: 7:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Sat & Sun: Closed

Note: We are closed for lunch from

1 - 2 Tue, Wed, & Thurs.

12:30 - 1:00 Friday

Address:

4915 Village Square Dr.

Paducah, ​​​​​​​KY 42001

Call Us

Follow Us On Social

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© 2024 Woodyard Dental Care LLC

Website Powered And Hosted By A.I. My Biz